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Old School Film Hack

Where am I?

22

This one should be a good puzzle.  The site where this photo was taken isn’t visible via the Google (I just checked), so you’ll have to rely upon something other than maps this time.  Here are your clues:

  • During the time that this structure was a viable entity, the water wasn’t stagnant.
  • It’s old.  Elements of it date back to the Mesozoic Era, and its history is richly intertwined with the narrative of our nation, our capital city, and our historical figures.  It’s even listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
  • This is so far off the beaten path that only the locals generally know about it, and it’s now scrawled with graffiti and has fallen in ruins.

So there you go.  Have fun.

22 thoughts on “Where am I?

  1. O Docker

    Apparently, Rock Creek has some geologic significance, as it marks the place where two tectonic plates come together, one forming the base of the Piedmont Plateau.

    It's possible Captain John Smith passed by in the early 1600s and mentioned the place in his writings.

    Many mills were built along the creek in the 1700s and 1800s, but the only one that survives intact, after being restored, is the Peirce Mill.

    The only other name I can find refers to an 'Argyle Mill'. Is this what remains of it?

    Like

  2. Mitch Zeissler

    Going cold, Doc… and after such a promising start.

    New clues:

    1) It's not in Rock Creek. Good guess, though. The geologic comment about the Mesozoic Era is a bit vague; focus on the Triassic, which is the first period of the Mesozoic. Huge hint here, practically giving it away.

    2) There is no written record of the good Captain having ever made it to this location.

    3) Peirce Mill is quite a bit newer, but it's also not the right *type* of mill.

    Like

  3. O Docker

    Cheez, you really do have to get up pretty early in the morning to beat the Tillerman.

    I think I'm going back to bed now.

    But will someone please tell the Tillerman that Abner Doubleday did not invent the game of baseball.

    Like

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