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Old School Film Hack

The Big Empty

26
Big Hole ValleyJackson, Montana (October 2016)iPhone 6S + 29/2.2

Big Hole Valley
Jackson, Montana (October 2016)
iPhone 6S + 29/2.2

Butch Hill is the name of the short brown summit to the right of this frame; one of the summits to the far left in the distance is Bloody Dick Peak, so named for an Englishman that said “bloody” a lot, while living in the area during the 1860’s (I just learned this tidbit while researching place names for this post).

I know that distances out West can be hard to judge, but the far mountains shown here are about 22 miles away, according to Google Maps.  And the tiny dots in the mid-distance aren’t cattle, but are actually immense hay stacks that are about the size of a large house, created by something called a “Beaver Slide Hay Stacker”.  These hay stackers (you can see photos of them here) are claimed to be unique to this region (read more about them here).  An exhibit that included one of them was located directly behind me at a roadside stop, which prompted us to visit and catch a breath of fresh air.

To give you a sense of how empty this scene was… we did not observe a single vehicle or human being for as far as the eye could see, nor were there any jets flying over, or other signs of civilization apart from the road that led us here.  No sounds, except for a few tiny birds and the wind.  And the temperature was brisk; the wind tossed our hair and tugged at our jackets — forcing us to beat a hasty retreat to the warmth of the rental car.

The perfect place for us.

26 thoughts on “The Big Empty

  1. Anne Mehrling

    It’s hard to imagine living in a place with so few people. If we want to get away from human sounds, we go up on the Blue Ridge Parkway. Yes, there are occasional bikers there, but otherwise all you hear is the wind.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Mitch Zeissler Post author

      Not for me. That’s what I grew up with in eastern Idaho. Sure, there were lots of people around us near town, but once you got outside of civilization, you were really on your own.

      We always traveled with extra food, water, a Coleman stove, blankets, and extra fuel — in the event that we encountered a problem and were too far away from other people to get assistance within an hour or two. And yes, we had to use them on occasion.

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    2. Mitch Zeissler Post author

      I lived in 30+ different places before I was 32-years-old. When we bought our current house — which we had intended to keep just five years before moving up to a better one — I finally said enough is enough and we haven’t moved since.

      Also, I’ve been in 49 of the 50 states (still haven’t visited Alaska), as well as several foreign countries.

      Even today I love travel — especially road trips — but not moving so much anymore.

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    3. Mitch Zeissler Post author

      I had a western drawl until we moved to the east coast. Now it’s kind of a mishmash of everything. We moved because my dad was a mechanical engineer who went wherever the work was to be found.

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  2. aparupac

    This is such a good post. Found the Bloody Dick Peak info quite interesting haha! The picture is a beauty too.
    Great post!

    I’m just starting out with my account. Can you give me some advice to gain readership? I’d love it if you could help. Thanks! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

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