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Old School Film Hack

My Kind of Sundowner

14
Watching the sunsetCentral Maryland (December 2016)Sony RX100 III + Zeiss Sonnar 1.8-2.8/24-70mm

Watching the sunset
Central Maryland (December 2016)
Sony RX100 III + Zeiss Sonnar 1.8-2.8/24-70mm

We live near Washington, DC… but most people don’t realize that this region isn’t yet a megalopolis like other major urban centers; i.e., New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami, etc.  The really dense areas of the DC region are generally contained within the 20-mile diameter of the Washington Beltway, although urban blight has slowly been creeping out to the suburbs and rural areas beyond since the mid-1970’s.  The small community where we live is in the middle of a designated agricultural zone, part of which you see in this image.

Will it remain this way forever?  Sadly, no.

Despite intense efforts to preserve the agricultural spaces, they are slowly being eroded by development.  This open space, for example, will eventually succumb to housing — although each property will be a minimum of 25-acres or more (but only for the wealthy — not working-class people like Cindy and me).  We understood that these views would eventually disappear when we moved to the area back in 1993; however, we figure we will continue to enjoy undisturbed sunsets like this one until we retire sometime in the next decade or so… when we finally leave the area and seek a less expensive place to live.

14 thoughts on “My Kind of Sundowner

  1. Mike Hartley

    I’ve lived in the space between Baltimore and Washington for my entire life. Almost 6 decades. It is and has been a wonderful area to live and grow up in and raise a family in. But I hear you on the over development and cost of living. As I approach retirement I hope I’m not forced to leave the area for economic reasons, but it may be so.

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    1. Mitch Zeissler Post author

      Yep. We’re in the same boat. Cindy is a native from Annapolis, and I’ve lived in the area since the mid-1970’s. Both of us just cannot believe how over-developed everything has gotten and how long it takes to do normal errand running now.

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  2. David

    A beautiful sundown, Mitch.

    Denver Metro is becoming that way as it expands further south and east along the Parker Road corridor (CO 83). The space between Aurora to Parker has filled in with subdivision after subdivision. From Franktown, you can see the development coming. My SIL, who has 25-acre ranchette near the $1-2 M homes of The Pinery (a very upscale subdivision south of Parker), says it is a matter of time before she’ll have to move away. In many ways, it’s sad and gives pause to wonder how many more $300-500K homes does the area need.

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    1. Mitch Zeissler Post author

      Thanks, David.

      We’ve seen Denver expanding a lot every time that we fly out there (usually every two or three years), and can confirm what you’re saying.

      We, too, wonder why so many high-end homes are being built, especially when the commutes for mid-to-low-level workers is just getting longer and longer with each passing year. I have had many coworkers over the years with commutes that are at least an hour or more each way, and some that are several hours each way. I should note that before my current job, I used to have a commute of similar length –about 60 minutes or so for the morning drive and almost double that for the evening drive. I can’t imagine doing that now.

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  3. Julie@frogpondfarm

    NZ is a beautiful country Mitch .. I guess I’m a tad biased 😃 The urban sprawl is alive and well here too. Where we live they are developing areas but there is no infrastructure to support the development. Not smart .. In saying that, we are still very lucky to live here .. our slice of heaven 😃

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